!!> BOOKS ✯ The Nun ⚡ Author Denis Diderot – Healing-oil.info

The Nun La Religieuse Memoirs of a Nun, Denis DiderotThe Nun or Memoirs of a Nun is an 18th century French novel by Denis Diderot Completed in about 1780, the work was not published until 1796, after Diderot s death The novel consists of a series of letters purporting to be from a nun, Suzanne, who implores the Marquis to help her renounce her vows, and describes her intolerable life in the convent to which she has been committed against her will Based in the Eighteenth century, Suzanne Simonin is La Religieuse Memoirs of a Nun, Denis DiderotThe Nun or Memoirs of a Nun is an 18th century French novel by Denis Diderot Completed in about 1780, the work was not published until 1796, after Diderot s death The novel consists of a series of letters purporting to be from a nun, Suzanne, who implores the Marquis to help her renounce her vows, and describes her intolerable life in the convent to which she has been committed against her will Based in the Eighteenth century, Suzanne Simonin is an intelligent and sensitive sixteen year old French girl who is forced against her will into a Catholic convent by her parents Suzanne s parents initially inform her that she is being sent to the convent for financial reasons, stating it is cheaper for her to become a nun rather than paying a dowry in marriage However, while in the convent, it is revealed to Suzanne that she is actually there because she is an illegitimate child as her mother committed adultery with another man By sending Suzanne to the convent, her mother thought she could make amends for her sins by using her daughter as a sacrificial offering for a new salvation 1977 18 1394 272 9786006182704 Through the halls and cells of a convent, guarded by high walls and austere religious customs, we follow a young nun making arrangements to escape a future that was imposed on her She has a knack for logic and no ear for vocation, so she is not able to find any justification for all the suffering and pious rules that govern her In her fight for freedom she uses all the means of revolt there are open protest, rigid obedience, lawsuit, relocation etc Embracing her destiny is not a viable alter Through the halls and cells of a convent, guarded by high walls and austere religious customs, we follow a young nun making arrangements to escape a future that was imposed on her She has a knack for logic and no ear for vocation, so she is not able to find any justification for all the suffering and pious rules that govern her In her fight for freedom she uses all the means of revolt there are open protest, rigid obedience, lawsuit, relocation etc Embracing her destiny is not a viable alternative and even an ungodly reader prays with her that it will not become one.The church s aberrations are rarely so vividly coloured as in the journey of this nun, who happens to find herself surrounded by odd habits of nunneries and can t make sense of them Our habits and rituals may seem ridiculous to an outside observer, all theso, when there is no reason behind them She is as close to a spring of meaning as it gets and everything she encounters forces her to drink from it old traditions, that must have some sense to have lasted for so long and to be so highly respected the lives of fellow nuns that must be meaningful in some way Nevertheless she finds none for herself and remains detached There s no hidden, internal logic of such a closed system, just an obliviousness to the general laws of the world.Although this novel is an epitome of all the wrongdoings of religious institutions to a degree that it made me laugh, I still felt a bit cheated by the final twist but in a most charming way there is I wanted to go back in time when stories emerged in passing and there was still as much effort put in personal pursuits as it was in professional ones If, of course, such a time ever existed and it was not reserved for the chosen few who might as well be living today So you re not going to come to see me any No, dear Mother And you won t let me come and see you in your cell any No, dear Mother Will you refuse my caresses It will be very difficult for me to do so, for I was born affectionate and I like being caressed, but I must I ve promised my confessor and I made a vow before the altar Looking at the above, is that the normal conversation between a nun and her mother superior Perhaps it was at that particular time On that note, where So you re not going to come to see me any No, dear Mother And you won t let me come and see you in your cell any No, dear Mother Will you refuse my caresses It will be very difficult for me to do so, for I was born affectionate and I like being caressed, but I must I ve promised my confessor and I made a vow before the altar Looking at the above, is that the normal conversation between a nun and her mother superior Perhaps it was at that particular time On that note, where do you possibly start with even attempting to write a review on any work by this exceptional 18th century French author and philosopher Diderot has indeed excelled himself here He was a leading literary figure and believed that people generally needed to socialize and he seemed to think it quite unhealthy that individuals could even contemplate withdrawing from society So it seems to be at the opposite end of the spectrum that he would write this 1770 novella posthumously published in 1796 he evidently was never in a hurry to get his written works to the public against a backdrop of girls, as young as fifteen, who were forced by their parents to take their perpetual vows for life in the claustrophobic atmosphere of the convents In addition, what intrigued methan anything about Diderot was that he was both an atheistic and a materialist, and yet he s written a religious book and a satire at that And to think that this book started as a hoax on a good friend I have learned, written as a hoax the purpose was initially to lure Marc Antoine Nicholas Croismare, Marquis of Lasson, back to Paris Following the death of his wife, Suzanne Davy de La Pailleterie a relation of Alexandre Dumas , the Marquis quit Paris and stayed away for eight years, during which time he had taken interest in the real life case of Marguerite Delamarre, who had claimed that, like the narrator of The Nun Suzanne Simonin, she was forced to take her vows against her will Diderot, along with his friends, decided to trick the Marquis into returning, and the letters, turned into the novel, were purported to be from Suzanne, appealing to the Marquis for help Unfortunately this all backfired, as the Marquis was not to be lured back and the issuance of this book subsequently took a different turn in its retelling.In my naivety, I believed that nuns typified godliness, devoutness, modesty and kindness, amongst other things, but what do we have here in this remarkable work Well nothing except nuns who are portrayed as conniving, murderous in thought, violent, lying and with a penchant for lesbian sexual pursuits The contradictory aspect is that despite all of this, they are also very na ve and emotionally sexually vulnerable I was amused nevertheless to see how licentious mother superiors could bring these impressionable young girls round to their way of thinking Some form of religious hysteria I guess I was disappointed nonetheless at the lack of bondage that was sad but at least I had the evidence of several pieces of rope to encourage me in this vague possibility.Sister Suzanne supposedly appears not to really understand methinks that s highly unlikely the tame advances and are they tame there s no leaping or bounding around with passion made towards her by her new mother superior Well it s all rather unfortunate for the nuns in the convent that a certain confessor gets involved in the act with our sister and then everything escalates completely out of control I found the use of the first person as the narrator a powerful tool for describing the plight of these unfortunate girls Most had their own dowries to pay for their time spent in the convents few ever left before the laws were changed but we also have the all pervading atmosphere of pre revolutionary France where the King had the right to sign lettres de cachet , whereupon an individual could be tossed into jail, or in this case, a convent without any recourse whatsoever These letters contained orders directly from the king, often to enforce arbitrary actions and judgments that could not be appealed This book set my thought processes reeling from one of comedy and laughter through to black humour and tragedy and when I finished the last page, I smiled and in fact I was even tempted to laugh out loud at Diderot s writing Perhaps I was on the verge of hysteria Weren t nuns supposed to suffer from hysteria On one hand, there s the violence demonstrated by the nuns and mother superior towards the supposedly reserved and innocent Sister Suzanne, who, on the other hand, basically seems to enjoy most aspects of her lifestyle at the three convents she stays in even though she s going through the wars On the surface she appears to remain mentally, not physically, untouched by everything that happens to her Our sister is a survivor and I always have a very high regard for that type of individual, be it in life or in a novel such as this.And as for Suzanne s mother could one really believe her story about her daughter s birth or was it all contrived The letters written by the likeable and ill fated Sister Suzanne Saulier known as Simonin in the story and in this correspondence to the Marquis and his replies are edifying and then what does he do, but throw a spanner in the works And the letters of Madame Madin all add spice to the tale.I don t know what it is that I find fascinating about nuns, monks and monasteries but I do One of those mysteries of life I guess.On that final note, all I can say is that I adored this book and look forward to readingbooks by this remarkable man I m applying for positions of paid work at the moment known as a job so I m told , and after about a month of no replies I m about ready to sign up for the convent I would love to be a nun Provided I had computer and broadband access, and was permitted to read any book I so pleased, I d put on my habit and sing the sacraments Unfortunately all the nun positions are filled at the moment, despite me faking three months nunning experience on my CV I m considering changing the name on my CV I m applying for positions of paid work at the moment known as a job so I m told , and after about a month of no replies I m about ready to sign up for the convent I would love to be a nun Provided I had computer and broadband access, and was permitted to read any book I so pleased, I d put on my habit and sing the sacraments Unfortunately all the nun positions are filled at the moment, despite me faking three months nunning experience on my CV I m considering changing the name on my CV to Jeffrey Archer, since everything else on there is made up British joke, Google the bestselling turd This book is amazing Diderot is such a fiendishly funny satirist, wiping the floor with all his 18thC cronies The Nun takes us from a sadistic convent regime of starving and torture into a sumptuous world of desirous shephebes my coinage hire me someone , in breathless first person prose excellent rhythm, pacing and plotting And a wee bit titillating The book was originally orchestrated as a hoax, which makes me love Diderot even Man was born to live with his fellow human beings Separate him, isolate him, his character will go bad, a thousand ridiculous affects will invade his heart, extravagant thoughts will germinate in his brain, like thorns in an uncultivated land.Given the untimely arrival of our Arctic Vortex, it is fitting that The Nun shudders with a frozen despair Bone chilling mornings are well suited for such guided tours of the dark side Abandon your preconceptions of the Enlightenment and moral cautionary Man was born to live with his fellow human beings Separate him, isolate him, his character will go bad, a thousand ridiculous affects will invade his heart, extravagant thoughts will germinate in his brain, like thorns in an uncultivated land.Given the untimely arrival of our Arctic Vortex, it is fitting that The Nun shudders with a frozen despair Bone chilling mornings are well suited for such guided tours of the dark side Abandon your preconceptions of the Enlightenment and moral cautionary tales, Diderot s creation is terrifying Apparently it was a practical joke used to trick a friend to return to Paris from the countryside The novel takes the form of an escaped nun tracing her history in a lengthy letter about a series of convents, ones where the prevailing theme is obedience One thinks of Martin Amis, give some someone absolute control over another and thoughts soon turn to torture Forget Sade or Huysmans, I was scared shitless by the novel s second Mother Superior think Martha Stewart as Torquemada Wowzers how I loved this book At face value, this is a slim and straight forward epistolary novel about a young woman who is forced into covenant life by her awful, self absorbed parents, who then proceeds to stand firm to her ideals as she is antagonized by sadistic, power hungry hypocrites and mentally disturbed sex fiends While Diderot was very much an atheist, he does a praiseworthy turn here giving voice to a sincerely religious narrator that has no desire to live the claustrophobic and Wowzers how I loved this book At face value, this is a slim and straight forward epistolary novel about a young woman who is forced into covenant life by her awful, self absorbed parents, who then proceeds to stand firm to her ideals as she is antagonized by sadistic, power hungry hypocrites and mentally disturbed sex fiends While Diderot was very much an atheist, he does a praiseworthy turn here giving voice to a sincerely religious narrator that has no desire to live the claustrophobic and tedious life of a nun Not so much an attack against religion as much as an attack on the socially constructed institution of religion, Diderot weaves subtle and sublime satire into his novel, making it not only a potent lashing of the people who misuse religion as a means of taking out their petty, insensible vengeance on the world, but also a melancholy cry of empathy for the men and women who find themselves trapped in the repressed, anti physical hologram that is the lifestyle of the insanely devout Bonus points for Diderot s generous characterizations of the complexities of gender roles waaay before there was any modern idea such as lesbianismand that endingoh that ending An act of pre modern postmodern genius or just a helluva twist, take your pick Read this book This went down in one sitting less a tribute to the literary merits of this novel andan expose of my coarse, voyeuristic nature Of the very base, chav chasing, track suit wearing, Vicky Pollard yeah but no but yeah variety where I settle my newly acquired Christmas overhang on the settee, spread out the fries and Baconnaise washed down with a spot of bitter shandy and munch my way through this epic saga of nuns being very, very naughty In France And, lets face it, nobody does naughty l This went down in one sitting less a tribute to the literary merits of this novel andan expose of my coarse, voyeuristic nature Of the very base, chav chasing, track suit wearing, Vicky Pollard yeah but no but yeah variety where I settle my newly acquired Christmas overhang on the settee, spread out the fries and Baconnaise washed down with a spot of bitter shandy and munch my way through this epic saga of nuns being very, very naughty In France And, lets face it, nobody does naughty like the French except maybe Berlusconi and the Bunga Bunga parties Which I only know about through hearsay because I m no longer a minor and therefore was not invited The picture I paint above is ofcourse, exactly the kind of parody I used to laugh over with my mates in college the beached whale with the millsboon tucked under one arm, and the tub of Hagendaaz in the other at the supermarket checkout, getting ready to spread her mutton dressed as lamb buttmuch on the sofa for a Friday night staycation Well, whose laughing now Wait, that came out wrong, like a bad Bushism I mean, except, I m not laughing any Still, Diderot gives a lotbang for my buck than Mills Boon, so some mercies abound.So, theres a pubescent girl Suzanne who is thrown into a convent in 1758 in a process called coerced monachization no Diderot didn t use this phrase No, I didn t come up with it either No, it has nothing to do with monage, m nage or any variation thereof Some academic did to explain the fact that up to half of all patrician females thats the nobility to you and me were voluntarily on purpose left in these convents against their will Once inside, Suzanne is subjected to all kinds of debauchery, torture, sexual harassment, incarceration, and basically any degrading acts you can think of And some you can t So, there I am, eating, reading, reading, eating, unable to stop, because I have GOT to know just how far that pesky mother Superior is going to take her dangerous liaison we have a slow progression from holding hands, to kissing the eyelids, the neck, the shoulders and orgasming fully clothed at this point which was surprising yet reminiscent of a Bikram kind of mind over matter way I wouldn t be surprised if it was offered as extra credit course somewhere How to orgasm fully clothed and at arms length from the object of your affection.So, as all of this action or inaction, depending on your point of view was developing, I did get this slightly uncomfortable snapshotty feeling of reading this novel for all the wrong reasons namely a vacuous mesmerisation is that a word with this 18c French Big Brother reality show The torture, the cruelty, the petty shenanigans of a bunch of sexually frustrated and extremely bored nuns I say all the wrong reasons because the novel was is meant to be so muchthan raunchy tell all Its actually a scathing indictment of a despicable practice of forcibly interring superfluous daughters in perpetual oblivion within the walls of these positively heathenish convents And once you were in, you were in Breaking the vows was impossible Que desolee.But I ll admit, thats not why I was reading it I was reading it to see how bad those nuns could get Diderot S The Nun La Religieuse Is The Seemingly True Story Of A Young Girl Forced By Her Parents To Enter A Convent And Take Holy Orders A Novel Mingling Mysticism, Madness, Sadistic Cruelty And Nascent Sexuality, It Gives A Scathing Insight Into The Effects Of Forced Vocations And The Unnatural Life Of The Convent A Succ S De Scandale At The End Of The Eighteenth Century, It Has Attracted And Unsettled Readers Ever Since For Diderot S Novel Is Not Simply A Story Of A Young Girl With A Bad Habit It Is Also A Powerfully Emblematic Fable About Oppression And Intolerance.This New Translation Includes Diderot S All Important Prefatory Material, Which He Placed, Disconcertingly, At The End Of The Novel, And Which Turns What Otherwise Seems Like An Exercise In Realism Into What Is Now Regarded As A Masterpiece Of Proto Modernist Fiction. This is an interesting novella, written in the form of a letter, by a nun to someone she hopes will help her break the vows which she took by force.The young French girl, Suzanne, is a victim of circumstances, hated by her family through no fault of her own, and forced to enter a convent She takes the orders against her wishes although she realizes she has no vocation.At the convent she falls into the bad books of the Mother Superior and is abused horrifically, sadistically even Some of the me This is an interesting novella, written in the form of a letter, by a nun to someone she hopes will help her break the vows which she took by force.The young French girl, Suzanne, is a victim of circumstances, hated by her family through no fault of her own, and forced to enter a convent She takes the orders against her wishes although she realizes she has no vocation.At the convent she falls into the bad books of the Mother Superior and is abused horrifically, sadistically even Some of the methods the nuns used to abuse her were pretty shocking The book is not an attack on Catholicism by any means Suzanne never loses her faith despite her ordeals What it is is an attack on the unnatural atmosphere of a cloister It brings to the forefront the awful practice of forcing young girls into convents, often when they were as young as 15 too young to really know what was going on Truly, Diderot paints convent life in the most awful way The convent conditions sound dreadful and don t seem to be conducive to growth or anything remotely positive As Suzanne said, I have plenty of courage, but no courage in the world can hold out in the face of neglect, solitude and persecution I think it was an interesting read for me as I had always assumed that convents wouldn t be such places of pettiness, and that relations between nuns would be civil at least Alas, this was not the case in this book Funny classic novel about a nun This novel was originally written as a joke And a joke it should be read and enjoyed La Religieuse The Nun is an 18th century French novel, by Denis Diderot Completed in c 1780, the work, however, wasn t published until 1796, after Diderot s death Diderot wrote a letter to his retired companion Marquis de Croismare to entice him to retreat back to Paris The letter was supposed to be from a nun incarcerated in a convent asking Croismare to save her Many o Funny classic novel about a nun This novel was originally written as a joke And a joke it should be read and enjoyed La Religieuse The Nun is an 18th century French novel, by Denis Diderot Completed in c 1780, the work, however, wasn t published until 1796, after Diderot s death Diderot wrote a letter to his retired companion Marquis de Croismare to entice him to retreat back to Paris The letter was supposed to be from a nun incarcerated in a convent asking Croismare to save her Many of Diderot s friends found the letters amusing so Diderot revised and made it into a novel Suzanne was a 19 y o girl who was the youngest in the family of 3 girls Her mother had an affair with another man and although Suzanne grew up with her mother s real husband, she felt unloved When she began to have admirers, her parents brought her to a convent to become a nun In front of the altar when the priest asked if she wanted to be come a nun, she answered no Her parents plead to her but she persisted But they died So, with nowhere else to go, she finally agreed However, she still felt trapped and she started to create scenes in the convent She was punished until a priest transferred her to another convent In that other convent, she was molested by the Mother Superior The plot is not funny Rather, if it were true in the 18th century France where most people are catholics , it could have created a scandal Also, learning in the book s introduction that it was supposed to be a joke, I could not help but laugh in many scenes in it My favorite is that part when after Suzanne was punished by the nuns, she prayed loud to God to forgive her tormentors The Mother Superior said that she Suzanne compared herself to Jesus Christ and they the nuns as the Jews who crucified Him.However, it is also written in Wikipedia that Diderot had a nun sister who died in a French Catholic church from overwork This was said to have changed his view on religion.Yesterday, I was in Fullybooked Rockwell with my father in law We were celebrating Father s Day together with my family and his wife and our US based visiting ninang My father in law bought two non fiction books worth P1,600 One of them was about WWII and the other one is a book on humor jokes He said that he does not read fiction because they are just gawa gawa ng tao Unknown to him, I had already bought two books worth P900 Pnin by my favorite Vladimir Nabokov and At Swim Two Birds by Flann O Brien I retorted that fiction books may have been that but most of them have basis in real life They are just made into fiction to beinteresting Non fiction could also be gawa gawa so we cannot be sure if they are all true.Like The Nun We know about those scandals inside the church Like the valiant story of McArthur or the fake medals of President Marcos that were erroneously written in our history That episode in Desperate Housewives was not funny at all Some Filipino doctors in the US even marched on the streets demanding apology from Fox and the producers of the show.I seldom buy regular priced books Forthan a year now, I have not been buying clothes except those given to me during holidays Father s Day, my birthday and Christmas by my family and friends I have rainy days fund However, I still know how to share and how to enjoy money to bring me happiness Good friends and books like The Nun do make me happy


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *